Trap, Neuter, Return/Re-home (TNR) Feral Cat Program

 

Breaking the cycle

TNR is a way to break the cycle of continuously breeding unwanted cats. The cats are trapped, taken to a clinic for spay/neuter, and given any needed medical treatment. Then appropriate homes are sought.

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Kittens and gentler cats can often be adopted as house pets. More fearful cats may be appropriate for CVAS's barn cat program. If they came from a safe location where someone will continue to care for them, they may be returned to that location.

 

The life of stray and feral cats is often one of misery. If they approach a house looking for food and warmth, they are likely to be chased away or even shot at.

The life of stray and feral cats is often one of misery. If they approach a house looking for food and warmth, they are likely to be chased away or even shot at.

Untreated infections can cause endless pain and lead to permanent disability

To help reduce pet overpopulation, CVAS partners with Stevens County Cat Care to spay and neuter cats. SCCC offers mobile clinics where low-income residents can get a male cat neutered for just $8, and a female spayed for just $14, which is far less than the cost of feeding growing kittens. Call SCCC at (509) 935-6369 for information about spay/neuter clinics for cats.

 

Feral Cats in the Community

Many people mistakenly believe that cats are like wild animals and do fine fending for themselves, summer or winter. This tragically wrong belief may explain the large number of cats abandoned along roadsides, and the high percentage of pet cats that are not spayed or neutered.

The life of a stray or feral cat is often one of misery. If they approach a house looking for food and warmth, they are likely to be chased away or even shot at. With no one looking out for them, they may be tormented by fleas and ear mites. Untreated infections can cause endless pain and permanent disability such as blindness. Too often, these animals, which were once someone's pets or are the offspring of someone's pets, are out of sight, out of mind.

One outdoor cat giving birth to five kittens can lead to five breeding feral cats. Over time, hundreds and eventually thousands of homeless cats can result.

Sometimes owners of unaltered outdoor cats simply don't know how many cats they have, and don't put enough food out, resulting in malnourishment for the whole group.